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A Fan Is Essentially An Electrical Motor With A Prop Or Drum-like Blades. When Bath And Range-hood Fans Stop Working, The Issue Is Usually One Of Two Things: The Fan Isn't Getting Power, Or The Motor

Here we look at fixing bath and kitchen area fans.

Fan Running but Not Working If the cooking area or bath fan shows any signs of life when you turn it on (such as humming), you understand it's getting power. If it's dead to the world, inspect the breaker that serves the fan.

The simplest repair for a motor that has burned out or stopped running is generally to turn off the power, open the fan, and replace the fan motor. A task like this doesn't involve doing any electrical circuitry-- many fan motors merely plug into a receptacle installed inside the real estate.

If your bathroom fan quits working, replacing the fan motor is an easy repair that you can do yourself in under an hour. A replacement engine will conserve you time and headache, as you don't have to remove the whole fan unit to make the repair work. A new engine may cost as much as a new fan. However, you can change it out quickly without needing to do major ceiling surgery or crawl around in the attic.

1. Begin by opening the fan. Eliminate the grille, which is typically held in location by spring clips. With the majority of, you can simply pull the cover off. Clean away any dust with a fabric or vacuum.

2. Then make a note of the fan's design number, which can typically be seen on the unit's real estate. Order a fan motor replacement online or from a device parts dealer. When you have the part in hand, move on to the next step.

3. Switch off the engine to the unit at the electrical circuit box, and use an electrical tester to make sure the system is not receiving power.

4. Disconnect the fan from its electrical source. If the motor has a simple plug placed into a receptacle behind the fan unit, just disconnect it. Disconnect the fan motor from the electrical circuitry when it is hard-wired to the electrical system, making certain to remember where each wire goes when you put in the new engine.

5. Remove the motor plate by getting rid of any screws and prying on or squeezing the side of the unit.

6. Remove the blower from the motor shaft. It might need to be unscrewed or just slid off the shaft if it's not secured in place. (If the fan gets harmed while doing so, you can purchase a low-cost replacement for this, too.)

7. Install the brand-new fan motor, just reversing this process. Once again, ensure power to the system is shut down at the main circuit breaker before dealing with any of the electrical wirings. Fasten the fan plate, turn the power back on and offer it a test! If this seems like to much it is advised to a call in a professional. www.hvacsystempros.com